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A quantity surveyor is a professional known for his or her expertise in the construction field. A quantity surveyor’s most important task is to calculate the costs one would expect to encounter across the entire construction process. First, let’s discuss all the Here are just a few of a quantity surveyor’s important responsibilities of a Quantity Surveyor:

  • Whether the project is low- or high-scale, the quantity surveyor is deemed responsible for managing finances related to the overall process.
  • It is also the responsibility of the quantity surveyor to ensure that the project remains on schedule and is completed on time.
  • While the project is taking place, the quantity surveyor keeps track of the costs incurred and is responsible for making sure that everything falls within the budget.
  • The quantity surveyor must be continually on the lookout for the most efficient, cost-effective ways to get the job done.
  • Because of the authority that comes with the role, the quantity surveyor is regarded as a neutral party – someone who can be depended upon to arbitrate in the event of disputes or disagreements between parties involved in a construction project.

Once you have understood the different requirements depending on the type of such a role, you can divide project, the role of quantity surveyor may perform all or only a few of a Quantity Surveyor into the duties listed above. Thus, it is probably easier to understand the job if we think of it as consisting of three definitive phases, before, during, and after the construction project. This is because the role of Let’s take a Quantity Surveyor is not limited to the above-mentioned responsibilities only. Depending on the kind of project and the occurrence of various situations, the role of the Quantity Surveyor may or may not change. Thus, it is easier to understand if you closer look at the role from three perspectives: each one.

Before the Construction

Before the start of the project, a Quantity Surveyor can start, the quantity surveyor is expected to first come up with the feasibility analysis for the complete project and then break the whole process down into different stages. taking the first stage involves taking information from the client and making presenting it takes the form of a complete project is what the first step is. After that.

Next, once the architects and designers and have submitted their work, the quantity surveyor inspects the architects are done with the various plans, a Quantity Surveyor will look at them and identify drawing and estimates the different costs that will be coming up as a result of each step will incur. If the costs are coming out appear to be higher than expected, the Quantity Surveyor can quantity surveyor will generally work with the team to bring reach a practical solution that will lower keep the overall cost price of the project to a minimum.

During the Construction

The role of the Quantity Surveyorquantity surveyor does not end here. The Quantity Surveyor also must make sure One of the major on-going tasks is to see that the project is being executed correctly, whilst keeping not losing sight of the budget in mind. If there are any delays or unexpected circumstances during the project, the Quantity Surveyorquantity surveyor will need to take into consideration the changes that effect they will incur in the budget allocated to have on the project. The job also must take involves taking note of any disagreements that might arise between participating parties during the project between any two parties and to resolve them as smoothly as possible.

After the Construction

Once the project is complete, the quantity surveyor draws up a document that reflects the actual costs incurred during the project. The document includes all the details of the project along with associated costs. Due to the wide scope of this role, certain skills are thought to be helpful when studying to become a Quantity Surveyor.quantity surveyor. These skills include:

  • A logical, analytical mind will help you effectively assess the requirements of the project.
  • Commitment and focus are also important traits for a quantity surveyor. You will be expected to remain committed to the completion of the project and may have to stay on site for long periods of time.
  • Good communication skills are vital to the success of any profession these days, and quantity surveyors are no exception. The ability to communicate effectively with different people involved in the project will help you make better decisions and complete the project without experiencing any major issues.
  • Since most quantity-surveying work revolves around cost management, you will be expected to be comfortable, if not exceptional, with numbers.
  • In addition, quantity surveyors are expected to be able to work well with different people; thus, it will help if you are a great team player.
  • Leadership skills are also an important asset throughout the entire process since quantity surveyors are deemed to be responsible for a wide range of activities during the project.
  • Concentration is an essential skill. Many of the tasks require deep thought, great imagination, and creative ideas to solve problems and issues that will always occur in the industry.

Bottom Line

Being a quantitative surveyor might seem like an easy job, but in fact, there’s a lot more to it than most people imagine. It is, therefore, advisable to make sure you know what the job entails before you take the plunge.

Being a quantity surveyor is a bit like being an accountant, a lawyer and a financial advisor all at the same time. You have to manage your client’s money during the construction (accountant), advice on commercial contracts (lawyer) and ensure that construction work is carried out in the most efficient, cost-effective way possible of in order to maximize value or profit.

The size of the company you work for will determine how much of each of those three disciplines you will be exposed to. For example in a large contracting company they may already have a lawyer who will prepare and negotiate contracts with clients, but for a smaller business with fewer resources, you may be required to wear all three hats at once.